War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0535 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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I used them constantly. The Coehorn train has not yet returned. Captain Brooker has started. Telegraph if anything like platforms or mantlets are essential for him. They were not sent, from want of wagons.

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE ARTILLERY, June 30, 1864-12 m.

Lieutenant Colonel N. BOWEN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Eighteenth Army Corps, Hdqrs. General Smith:

Captain Brigham informs me that he expects orders to fire on Petersburg and wants percussion-shells for the purpose. Every wagon I can command is forwarding ammunition. Will not the general delay giving the order for a day or two? Captain Brigham has an ample supply of fuse-shell designed for the special object of his battery. Both other 30-pounder batteries have plenty of

percussion-shells for Petersburg, with about half the range.

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

SMITH'S HEADQUARTERS, June 30, 1864.

Colonel ABBOT:

General Smith says will try the fuse-shell, but they will probably fail, so please make every effort to hurry up the percussion.

N. BOWEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS, June 30, 1864.

General BROOKS:

I desire to notify you that General Butler has just left, and will be gone about forty-eight hours. He has left me as acting chief of staff to conduct the machinery at these headquarters.

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH CORPS, June 30, 1864.

Colonel SHAFFER,

Chief of Staff:

General Foster reports that the enemy does not reply to the gunboats; that he has a post of observation near Ruffin's house, and that the enemy appears in considerable numbers in the woods in rear of the house.

W. T. H. BROOKS,

Brigadier-General.