War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0523 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 1, 1864.

Respectfully returned with the following remarks: An officer of the One hundred and fourteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers called at these headquarters last evening for information in relation to relieving the guard here, which had then been on duty forty-eight hours. On a reference of the matter to the commanding general he decided that as General Ferrero's division had come up the two regiments serving at headquarters temporarily placed under the order of Major-General Hancock could be returned, and a latter was accordingly given to the officer, addressed to Major-General Gibbon, directing that the two regiments be relieved, and Major-General Hancock was informed by telegraph that the order had been given. It was not supposed that the withdrawal of this small number of men could, under the circumstances, endanger the safety of Major-General Hancock's line, and if the order was likely to have this effect it is to be presumed that General Gibbon would have deferred complying with it until he could have had an opportunity of referring the matter back for further instructions.

By command of Major-General Meade:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DETACHMENT CAVALRY CORPS, June 30, 1864.

Colonel WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Corps:

My pickets from the Gurley house to the right report hearing the rumbling of a train or artillery passing down the Halifax road. They attempted to approach the railroad to ascertain, but found the enemy in rifle-pits in the woods.

Very respectfully,

T. M. BRYAN, Jr.,

Colonel, Commanding Detachment.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS, June 30, 1864.

General S. WILLIAMS:

The following just received:

HEADQUARTERS DETACHMENT CAVALRY CORPS, June 30, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: A single scout from my command has returned and reports having been near the railroad near the Gurley house. He could see no troops, but saw a cloud of dust, indicating a movement of troops; he saw a wagon train passing down the railroad to our left, and he counted seven of the enemy's pickets on the railroad. This scout was Captain Britton, of the Eighteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

T. M. BRAYN, Jr.,

Colonel, Commanding.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK.