War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0494 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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it will save time perhaps Wright had better move a division and let Gibbon close up to him, but it would be preferable to send Gibbon, followed by Wright.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH CORPS, June 29, 1864-12 m.

General HUMPHREYS:

Upon further reflection Wright had better at once send a division, to be followed and supported by his corps, down the plank road to Reams' Station, and Gibbon be drawn in to support left of Second Corps. Sheridan's was yesterday ordered to the crossing of the Warwick Swamp by the plank road, and is, I hope, now en route for that point. He should be hurried up without loss of time, and Wright advised of his expected arrival. Let Wright move as promptly as possible, and fell Hancock to look out for the left. Send Ferrero word to be ready to move up and to extend to Gibbon's vacated position.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS, June 29, 1864-12.20 p. m.

(Received 12.45 p. m.)

General HUMPHREYS:

Wright should leave his pickets our as he will return as soon as Wilson is relieved.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

Memorandum of Reconnaissance.

SIGNAL STATION, SPRING HILL, June 29, 1864.

The country between Ashton Swamp and Swift Creek, as seen from this point, seems to be tolerably level, with considerable clearing and having a width between those limits of from two-thirds to one mile, the width increasing as you recede from Port Walthall. The northern bank of Ashton Swamp rises abruptly, is everywhere wooded, and commands the plateau over which our march would lie. The swamp itself is, for a mile or two, said to be a considerable obstacle. About two miles and a half from Port Walthall the stream or creek comes out from a gorge in these highlands about at the Walthall Junction. The highlands cross the stream, and about at Craig's seem to be somewhat higher than elsewhere. The south bank of Swift Creek, at a distance of a mile or more from its mouth, commences to be high and commanding the plateau in question. Some traces of earth-work could be seen on the more prominent spurs.

From Fort Clifton across to Swift Creek appears to be a line of intrenchments (rifle-pits). From this position no traces of the rebel works north of Ashton Swamp were observed nor any trace of works barring egress between the swamp and creek. This position is not a favorable one for a pontoon bridge. It would be 500 yards long and the construc-