War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0460 OPERATIONS I SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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not think it probable that I shall soon be able to discharge my duties with profit to the command or credit to myself. I therefore request that leave may be granted me as requested some days since, and that another general officer be assigned to this division.

I am, general, truly, your obedient servant,

EDWARD W. HINKS,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, In the Field, Va., June 26, 1864.

Major WILLIAM RUSSELL, Jr.,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Eighteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I deem it my duty to submit for the information of the major-general commanding the following statement of the condition of my command, viz: The division is now composed of ten regiments, organized into two brigades. Of these regiments I consider but five to be effective for duty in line of battle; to wit, the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Twenty-second. These are the regiments of infantry that were engaged on the 15th instant.

The Tenth and Thirty-seventh Regiments of Infantry are largely composed of new recruits, and but partially organized; the Fifth Massachusetts Cavalry (dismounted) is also composed of new recruits, and not drilled in infantry formations; the First and Second U. S. Colored Cavalry (dismounted) are unskilled in the use of arms, untaught in infantry formations, and without drill and proper discipline.

Justice to these troops, as well as a regard for the true interests of the service, would seem to require that these five regiments last named be sent to a camp of instructions, and prepared for effective service. As they now are I am unwilling to risk them in battle.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. W. HINKS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS, June 26, 1864.

Brigadier-General GRAHAM,

Commanding Army Gun-Boats:

I have information from Mr. Mills, of Mount Airy, just this side of Arlington, that he hears cutting on the island between Fort Clifton and the mainland. That cutting of timber is, of course, for one of two purposes-either to get a range on some battery, or for the purpose of getting a road through for a pontoon bridge for a movement upon General Smith's flank and rear. I either case it needs watching. Will you send up there a reconnoitering party to-night and find out what the cutting means and report to me, watching carefully that nobody crosses the river.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.