War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0349 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS SIXTH CORPS,

[June 23, 1864]-8.30 a.m.

Major-General MEADE:

I am about one mile and a half from Williams'. Here one road goes west, say two miles, to the railroad; on this cavalry has just gone out. Ricketts is on a road running north, and his line faces north. The line of Russell is said to face west. We are going to see about it. A prisoner just in says Wilcox's division came down about 11 yesterday. Their right, before they marched, did not reach the railroad in their fortifications. They marched down the railroad and then struck off to the left by the road mentioned above. Two trains started for Weldon this morning but returned.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH CORPS,

June 23, 1864-10 a.m.

Major-General MEADE:

Have just seen General Ricketts' line and a part of General Russell's. Their general direction is as indicated by my last, and they are rather crooked by reason of going through thick woods. It is possible to go westerly along the Williams road to the railroad, but you must pass through some fields. The rebel infantry came through an open field north of the Aiken house, which lies, say, two miles and a half west of the Williams house and one and a half east of the railroad. About eighty of our sharpshooters have reached the railroad, seeing only a few cavalry. Rickett's left rests on a large field one mile and a half from the railroad. Very little water hereabout. We are about to connect with the railroad by a skirmish line. General Russell is a little ahead of Barlow and about to resume connection with him and straighten his line.

T. LYMAN.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH CORPS,

June 23, 1864-10.15 a.m.

Major-General MEADE:

From all the information I can get personally and through staff officers, the general direction of my line is not far from right, though it will probably be advanced somewhat. The woods are so dense that the line can be determined only by survey, and those I have got so far do not agree at all. Captain Paine, who has just made his appearance, promises to run it for me at once. From his account my right is in advance of Barlow's left, and I have directed that a connection be made at once, though I think it ought to be done by moving his left forward. I have possession of the railroad by a detachment, and shall extend the picket-line to it. It is one mile and a half to two miles from my left. Would it be worth while to attempt destroying the road at that point? It can't be done effectually, I presume, without a large force, and this would involve a separation between the Sixth and Second Corps.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.