War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0330 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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ment separate from the colonel's column, and that the column went about five miles distant, and only the cavalry, one platoon, was one mile and a half out on Trent road. I will communicate as soon as I hear from the column.

A. W. SMITH,

Captain, Commanding Camp.

BATCHELDER'S CREEK, N. C., June 22, 1864.

Brigadier-General PALMER:

Your dispatch received. The signal line is open from Beech Grove to Red House, and everything quiet. Two cavalrymen have just returned; report the column returning on Trent road about one mile and a half outside the picket-line, having 70 prisoners, amongst them 1 colonel and several officers, and report not a man lost.

A. W. SMITH,

Captain, 132nd New York Infantry, Commanding Camp.

BATCHELDER'S CREEK, N. C., June 22, 1864.

Brigadier-General PALMER:

Lieutenant-Colonel Hitchcock's detachment, consisting of five cavalrymen, one piece of artillery, and two companies of the One hundred, and thirty-second and two companies of the Fifteenth Connecticut, have returned and will be in camp in a few minutes.

A. W. SMITH,

Captain, 132nd New York Infantry, Commanding Camp.

CITY POINT, VA., June 23, 1864-9 a.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

Yesterday and this morning have been consumed in extending our lines to the left to envelop Petersburg. The Second and Sixth Corps are now west of the Jerusalem plan road. Yesterday, in moving to this position, two corps became separated. The enemy pushed out between them and caused some confusion in the left of the Second Corps, and captured four pieces of artillery. Order was soon restored and the enemy pushed back. This morning no enemy is found on the left. This will be pushed forward until the enemy is found. The Petersburg papers of yesterday state that Hunter has been routed and already 3,000 of his men have been captured.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: The siege of Richmond bids fair to be tedious, and in consequence of the very extended lines we must have, a much larger force will be necessary than would be required in ordinary sieges against