War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0243 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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active operations are carried on elsewhere, so as to occupy the enemy, a very small force could protect this position. Perhaps one-third of mine could do it. I think that to my right, in Burnside's front, our position os equally strong for defense. Near the Jerusalem plank road is what looks like a reservoir on a commanding hill, which the enemy have I think made use of as a redoubt. This seems to be the right of the line they occupy now. If we go around on that road we shall come outside of the enemy's main line of works, which we are here inside of. In front of my right and of General Burnside is a high ridge whose summit must be very close to Petersburg and overlook the town and bridges. I cannot see what works the enemy have on it, if any. From the summit must be very close to Petersburg and overlook the town and bridges. I cannot see what works the enemy have on it, if any. From the summit must be very close to Petersburg and overlook the town and bridges. I cannot see what works the enemy have on it, if any. From the summit the ground slopes very gently toward us for about 600 yards, and then makes a steeper descent to the Poo River. Just a little way from the crest of this steeper slope is the enemy's line. If we carry this latter by assault, the enemy could take no intermediate position till he reached the main ridge. This assault, if made, should be in the morning, so that the night could be used to get the troops in position. If we made regular approaches to this first line of the enemy we would have to run them, perhaps, 300 yards, and then he would probably construct new lines as fast as we advanced, so that we should have to dig all the way to the main summit, probably 600 or 800 yards farther.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH CORPS, June 20, 1864 - 11 a. m.

General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have sent out for a special report in regard to the firing last night. We thought it only a scare and no concern was felt about it. No report was made of it to me, and I thorough it was on my right.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 20, 1864 - 11.15 a. m. (Received 12.20 p. m.)

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps:

Your dispatch of 9.30 a. m. received. The commanding general directs me to say that the information contained and the suggestions made are valuable. No plan of operation is yet decided upon. For the present the position will be held defensively, and in that connection he directs you to extend your left as far as practicable consistent with its security, and that, as suggested by you, you make reconnaissances on the left to ascertain more about the position, character, and strength of the enemy's right, using for that purpose the cavalry under your command, and such of of your disposable infantry as may be necessary. The commanding general directs me to say that he believes the work you refer to near the Jerusalem road to be the reservoir, judging from a paragraph in a Richmond paper. I send you a copy of a note* from

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* Ante, p.235.

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