War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0223 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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JUNE 19, 1864.

General MEADE,

Commanding, &c.:

Will you please send me one prisoner from each regiment that you have captured? I wish them for examination and information. The troops of my division, as they return, can take them over.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 19, 1864 - 10 p. m. (Received 10.50 p. m.)

Major-General BUTLER:

I have directed my provost-marshal to send you the prisoners you ask for.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

CITY POINT, June 19, 1864 - 10.40 p. m.

Major-General BUTLER:

General Hunt, chief of artillery, Army of the Potomac, reports that if he had some 30-pounder Parrott guns he could do excellent service with them. I understand they would give him control of the railroad bridge. If you have such a battery I wish you would send it out.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE ARTILLERY, June 19, 1864 - 10.30 p. m.

Brigadier General J. G. BARNARD,

Chief Engineer, Armies in the Field:

GENERAL: I have received and read the two papers herewith returned.* I decidedly prefer the rope mantlets. I find by trial at twenty paces that the penetration of our Springfield rifle, elongated bullet, is between two and two and five-tenths inches. The mantlets are six inches thick and they are thus perfectly rifle-proof. Their dimensions are the following, which are very convenient in practice:

The opening can readily be cut larger if necessary. We have done so at least in one instance, to enlarge the traverse of the gun in an

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* See Delafield to Barnard and Hunt's indorsement, pp.20,21.

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