War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0202 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS, June 18, 1864 - 8 p. m.

Colonel J. W. SHAFFER:

General Gillmore left his quarters too late for me to take possession to-night. I shall stop at my old camp. Everything is quiet.

W. T. H. BROOKS,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, TENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, Va., June 18, 1864.

Colonel J. C. ABBOTT,

Seventh New Hampshire Vols., Commanding Second Brigade:

COLONEL: The general commanding directs that you at once have four companies of some regiment of your command move out to the left of your picket-line, to support the picket in case of attack; the balance of the regiment will be held in readiness to move out if their services are required. One regiment each from Colonel Howell's and Colonel Plaisted's brigades have moved out to the support of the pickets on their lines.

P. A. DAVIS,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS, June 18, 1864.*

General JOHN A. RAWLINS,

Chief of Staff, Armies of the United States:

GENERAL: The ill health of Brigadier-General Hinks, commanding colored division, will compel him to give up his duties for a while, if not permanently, and I am left without a proper officer to command a is led. The second in command, Brigadier-General Wild, is entirely unfitted for the command, and besides is in arrest at present for insub-ordination. General Hink's division now numbers, in the field return of to-day, 5,000 men nearly. Of this there are four regiments, three of dismounted cavalry and one of infantry, yet undrilled in loading their muskets, numbering in all about 2,200 men, and General Hinks reports them unfitted by reason of ignorance of drills for service in the field. I would therefore respectfully recommend that these men be sent back to some point where they can be instructed and aid in holding intrenched lines or position, will leave General Hinks about 2,800 men. I understand that General Ferrero, commanding division of colored troops in the Ninth Corps, has about 4,000 men. I have, therefore, respectfully to suggest that the two divisions be consolidated under the command of General Ferrero, known to be an excellent division commander, and that the consolidated division be assigned to the Ninth or Eighteenth Corps, as the General-in-Chief may judge best for the interest of the service. There is also in this command one light battery with colored cannoneers, which is expensive and worse than worthless,

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* Printed from a copy erroneously dated. The communication was written June 26. A duplicate was furnished General Butler, for whose answer see p.458.

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