War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0189 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS, June 18, 1864-1.30 a.m.m

Major-General BUTLER:

Your dispatches of 11.25 p.m. and 12.05 a.m. just received, and the instructions in the latter will be obeyed. The troops are now forming and will soon be ready, when the assault will be made at once.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

JUNE 18, 1864-1.40 a.m.

(Received 2.20 a.m.)

General WRIGHT:

As you were unable to make the attack at the time first ordered you will suspend the attack ordered, but hold all your troops in readiness to take advantage of any unmasking of the enemy in your front caused by their withdrawal of troops to re-enforce Petersburg against an attack that will be made by General Meade in the morning.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

(Same to General Terry.)

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS, Battery No. 3, June 18, 1864-2.20 a.m.

Major-General BUTLER:

Your dispatch of 1.40 a.m. just received, and at the same moment one of my staff, who supervised the formation of the troops, reported the attacking column ready to move forward. General Ames, with 1,000 men, formed the first line, and General Ricketts, with his division, formed those in rear. The first line, under cover of the darkness, had been able to form along the skirmish line, and the others at short distances in rear. So far everything had progressed favorably. A brigade from Russell's division had been posted some little distance to the right of the main column under cover of the woods, for a flanking attack. In obedience to your order I have suspended the attack, and the troops are returning to within the intrenchments, where they will be ready to take advantage of any withdrawal on the part of the enemy.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH CORPS, June 18, 1864-12.45 p.m.

Major-General BUTLER,

Commanding Department,&c.:

Reports from the picket-line and examinations by staff officers fail to show any withdrawal of the enemy from our front, and all reports agree that they are still in strong force in their lines. The pickets have been instructed to keep a strict watch upon the enemy, and it is believed that no movement in force can be made without its being perceived by us. My command is, and has been all day, under orders to move at once on the receipt of orders to that effect.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.