War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0175 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, June 18, 1864-8.15 a.m.

Major-General MEADE:

Am at the line taken by Burnside last night, beyond the house at our advanced breast-works. Crawford is the other side of the wood.

Griffin is forming here.

T. LYMAN.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, June 18, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

Three deserters just came over of Ransom's command. They came with a brigade of 1,200 men from Richmond last night by rail.

THEO. LYMAN,

Lieutenant-Colonel,&.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 18, 1864-10 a.m.

Major-General WARREN:

You will please advise me at what time your columns of assault will be prepared to attack the enemy in your front, in order that I may notify Birney and Martindale and have a simultaneous attack. I desire the enemy attacked at all hazards by each corps, and desire to arrange for its being simultaneous, but if it requires much time to effect co-operation the attack will be ordered for a fixed hour and the chances taken. Please answer me at once.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

(Same to General Burnside.)

FIFTH CORPS, June 18, 1864-10.30 a.m.

Major-General MEADE:

I have my lines of battle formed on the right of the railroad, and am endeavoring to get my skirmishers farther forward and batteries established on the left of the railroad. The enemy's skirmishers as yet have [not] enfiladed the advance on my right, but presume my arrangements have by this time compelled them to fall back. I have not been able as yet to get the ravine formed by the Poo River, and cannot say in what condition my troops could cross it. I am in most places now in sight of the enemy's line. He has a good deal of artillery and uses it freely. All the time I can get I can improve the chances of successful assault. I think the enemy will not be able to strengthen his lines by digging. At present I am not well enough informed to say when I can be prepared to assault, nor to advise one at any place we have yet approached, but I hope to receive information from my left soon. If the enemy's line is as it now seems we are in front of an angle, both sides of which I hope we can enfilade with artillery as soon as we can drive them to their main line. The telegraph line is just up to my front, and I will keep you well informed.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.