War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0139 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, NINTH ARMY CORPS,

June 17, 1864.

Colonel RAULSTON:

By direction of the commanding general you will take command of the Second Brigade of this division. You will collect all your men together, get them in the best position possible, and hold them in readiness to join in an attack to be made to-morrow morning at 4 o'clock.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. V. RICHARDS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsement.]

Lieutenant-Colonel Christ turned the command over to me shortly after he was wounded. I have since been at work making myself acquainted with the positions occupied by the several regiments composing the brigade. I did not issue any orders to them, as I was waiting to learn whether the general desired me to take command. I do not consider our present position as favorable, but it can, in my opinion, be held until it may be bettered. I cannot safely withdraw the men from the position they now occupy, and therefore cannot collect them all together as the general desires, but what can be done to collect them and place them properly I will do to the best of my ability.

W. C. RAULSTON,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 17, 1864-5 p.m.

Brigadier-General FERRERO:

Commanding Fourth Division, Ninth Corps:

The commanding general directs that you cover the movement of the trains to their park between Bailey's Creek and City Point, and that you then report with your division to Major-General Burnside, commanding Ninth Corps.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS,

Pontoon Bridge, June 17, 1864-7.30 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

My division began crossing 4.30 a.m.; will all be over by 10. Having had no forage, and short rations for several days, I shall delay a little while to draw supplies and rest, and move out as soon as possible. If there is any pressing necessity for my division at Petersburg please send back word, that we may lose no time, though I cannot urge too strongly the necessity of our having rest and getting the horses unsaddled.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. WILSON,

Brigadier-General.