War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0115 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 16, 1864-5.45 p.m.

I have read the within order, and under the instructions of Lieutenant-General Grant have suspended the order till after dark, or the arrival of the Fifth Corps, as General Kautz's cavalry is required in the position assigned him by General Grant, to protect the left flank of this army until more infantry arrives.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 16, 1864-9.30 p.m.

Brigadier-General KAUTZ:

As General Warren has arrived I no longer desire to suspend the order you received from General Butler, and you can obey it, if you think proper. I have reported my action to Lieutenant-General Grant.

GEO. G. MEADE.

Major-General.

GUN-BOAT STATION, June 16, 1864-6.40 p.m.

General BUTLER:

It being reported that Fort Clifton was evacuated I sent two boats within 150 yards. They received several shots from the fort.

GRAHAM,

General.

COBB'S HILL SIGNAL STATION, June 16, 1864.

General BUTLER:

The Navy have only two gun-boats that can reach Fort Clifton. They will open immediately.

GRAHAM,

General.

CITY POINT, VA., June 17, 1864-11 a.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

The Ninth Corps this morning carried two more redoubts, forming part of the defenses of Petersburg, capturing 450 prisoners and 4 guns. Our successes are being followed up. Our forces drew out from within fifty yards of the enemy's intrenchments at Cold Harbor, made a flank movement of an average of about fifty miles' march, crossing the Chickahominy and James Rivers, the latter 2,000 feet wide and 84 feet deep at point of crossing, and surprised the enemy's rear at Petersburg. This was done without the loss of a wagon or piece of artillery and with the loss of only about 150 stragglers, picked up by the enemy. In covering this move Warren's corps and Wilson's cavalry had frequent skirmishes with the enemy, each losing from fifty to sixty killed and wounded, but inflicting an equal, if not greater, loss upon the enemy.