War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0095 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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separated from our present left by a bad swamp and a considerable interval. I think General Grant, if he knew the circumstances (he is now at Bermuda Hundred), would desire you to get up on Norfolk and Petersburg road instead. I would so advise.

C. B. COMSTOCK,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 16, 1864-9.30 p.m.

Major-General WARREN:

Move up your command, and for the present mass it on the left of General Burnside, and to-morrow examine the ground with a view to testing positions. General Kautz has been picketing out on the left. He will indicate the roads he has been picketing, which, as he has been ordered away by General Butler, I wish you to picket and watch. Report your headquarters to mine, the position of which Captain Sanders will indicate.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

JUNE 16, 1864.

Brigadier-General CUTLER,

Commanding Fourth Division:

GENERAL: The First Division will move on to Petersburg in a short time. The major-general commanding desires that you be ready to move immediately after General Griffin.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRED. T. LOCKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 16, 1864-7.30 a.m.

Major-General WRIGHT,

Commanding Sixth Corps:

The commanding general directs that you send 800 or 1,000 men to report to General Benham. They will be occupied about two hours.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS, June 16, 1864-1.40 p.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

It is expected that the last of the trains will be within our lines by 4 p.m., and I have directed General Wilson to move in with his cavalry at dark, starting such of it soon as can be moved without attracting the enemy's attention. As soon as it reaches here it will be crossed over. A late dispatch from Wilson says no movements on the enemy's