War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0091 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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on your left, in position to be designated by General Barnard. He will be ready either for an attack at the hour designated or to aid if the enemy should come out and attack. In the absence of General Meade and myself you will take general control of all the troops now in position about Petersburg. Orders have gone to General Meade to come up in person, and I think he may be looked for about 5 p.m.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

This communication was turned over to me about 2 p.m. June 16, on my arrival on the field in front of Petersburg and assuming command.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS, June 16, 1864-10.30 a.m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT or

Major-General SMITH:

GENERAL: The commander of the picket in front of General Birney's division reports a column of the enemy about a mile long moving to our left. General Burnside is here at my headquarters, and his troops are close at hand. I also inclose a report of a signal officer on the same subject.

Your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

BATTERY 5, June 16, 1864-9 a.m.

General HANCOCK:

Another brigade of enemy's infantry has just passed our left, moving on same road reported in last message.

TAYLOR.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS, June 16, 1864.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: General Burnside has not yet attacked. He sent to me fifteen minutes since to know when we were going to begin. I told him that we were only waiting for him, and that he ought to commence at once. Birney will attack when he hears Burnside. He finds the enemy strong about him, and is waiting for Burnside's division. I suppose it will soon come. Colonel Crandell, One hundred and twenty-fifth New York, is wounded. Colonel Baird, One hundred and twenty-sixth New York, is killed. I do not think the loss heavy but in officers. I do not think the men attack with persistence; they appear to be wearied. We are intrenching the ground we now hold.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.