War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0077 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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GENERAL BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS, June 15, 1864-2 a.m.

Rear-Admiral LEE,

Commanding, &c.:

Can you temporarily spare a gun-boat to aid in covering the crossing of General Grant's army near Fort Powhatan? If so, please send one. I will send to-morrow and, with your aid, will put down the obstructions in such spot as you may designate.

By command of Major-General Butler:

FRED. MARTIN,

Captain and Commissary of Musters.

JUNE 15, 1864-6 a.m.

General BUTLER:

I will send a gun-boat to find if it is wanted below Bermuda Hundred. The fog on the river delayed the delivering of the dispatch before 5 o'clock.

S. P. LEE,

Acting Rear-Admiral.

JUNE 15, 1864.

General BUTLER:

There are three gun-boats and one iron-clad at Fort Powhatan now. I wish to see General Grant; where is he?

S. P. LEE,

Acting Rear-Admiral.

JUNE 15, 1864.

Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE,

Commanding, &c.:

I am directed by General Grant to sink the obstructing vessels in such place as I can protect them by my guns. I should be glad if you would aid in so doing, upon conference with my chief engineer, General Weitzel, designating the spot which will afford the best aid to your fleet. General Grant will this evening have his headquarters at City Point.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

FLAG-SHIP AGAWAM,

Farrar's Island, June 15, 1864-11 p.m.

(Via Fort Monroe, Va., 10 a.m. 17th.)

Honorable GIDEON WELLES,

Secretary of the Navy:

Early this morning General Butler signaled me that he would sink his obstructions to-day. Ordering Commander Craven to assist the army engineers to sink these obstructions where and as they wished, I went to see General Grant, who informed me that he had several days ago ordered General Butler to do so. Five vessels were, according to the plan of campaign, sunk to-day, under the directions of the army engineers, on Trent's Reach Bar, which will to some extent add to the security of the military situation. General Meade's army is crossing on pontoons at Wilcox's Wharf. The operation will take two or three