War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0019 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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I will have Petersburg secured, if possible, before they get there in much force. Our movement from Cold Harbor to the James River has been made with great celerity and so far without loss or accident.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES, Camp near Charles City Court-House, Va., June 14, 1864.

Major General GEORGE G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

The moment the corduroy approaches opposite Fort Powhatan are finished to the river have the pontoon bridge laid and the river closed against the passage of boats until all your troops and trains are crossed to the south side. Direct boats arriving with troops to debark them below the bridge, from where they will march to their place of destination. When you have completed the crossing of your army have the pontoon-boats, bridging, &c., taken to City Point.

By command of Lieutenant-General Grant:

JNumbers A. RAWLINS,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

WILCOX'S WHARF, VA., June 14, 1864-9.30 a.m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: There are three boats here for immediate use in crossing troops, and the officer in charge reports several others in the vicinity of Fort Powhatan. Expedition in crossing is what is wanted, and to secure this you can cross from different points or all from one place, as you deem best. One corps should remain on this side until the artillery and wagons are well over.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT, June 14, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Dan Cole and a small party of courts went this morning about three miles back on the road headquarters came out upon yesterday. They then struck across the country till they reached the road which, at Saint Mary's Church, forks with the road we came on and runs from Saint Mary's Church to Harrison's Landing. He here ran into a line of the enemy's pickets and thinks there was a reserve behind him. He says they were mounted infantry; at all events they had rifles. They followed him, and he learned from a citizen at whose house they had been this morning with some of our prisoners, whom they were marching back to the rear, that they represented themselves to be in force, and coming down this way.

Very respectfully,

GEORGE H. SHARPE,

Colonel, &c.