War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0817 Chapter LII. EXPEDITION AGAINST WELDON RAILROAD, N. C.

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P. J. CLAASSEN,

Colonel 132nd New York Infantry, Commanding Expedition.

JUNE 20-25, 1864.-Expedition against the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, N. C.

Report of Colonel James Jourdan, One hundred and fifty-eighth New York Infantry, commanding expedition.

HEADQUARTERS SUB-DISTRICT OF BEAUFORT, Morehead City, N. C., June 28, 1864.

I have the honor to report that in compliance with instructions from the commanding general I started on Monday, the 20th instant, 5.15 a. m., from the line of railroad in command of an expedition composed of about 500 men of the Ninth Vermont Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Ripley; about 500 men of the One hundred and fifty-eighth New York Volunteers, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel W. H. McNary; one section of Battery C, Third New York Artillery, commanded by Lieutenant Enoch Jones; one section of 12-pounder howitzers, under Lieutenant Wilson, First U. S. Artillery; one company of cavalry, about fifty-five men, commanded by Captain Graham, First North Carolina Volunteers, about thirty-five men of Twenty-third New York Cavalry, under Captains Cummings and Spann, and about 340 men Twelfth New York Cavalry, commanded by Colonel Savage, together with three mountain howitzers, the object of which was to destroy a portion of the Wilmington road Weldon Railroad, capture and destroy a train of cars, and if possible burn the large covered bridge over Northeast Cape Fear River.

Colonel Savage marched from New Berne 19th instant, 10 p. m., direct for Pollocksville and at once rebuilt the bridge over Mill Creek, and on the arrival of the infantry the column marched 3.30 p. m. direct for Young's Cross-Roads; 100 men of the One hundred and fifty-eighth New York Volunteers, under Captain Hyron Kalt, having been directed to proceed to the junction of the roads leading from Young's Cross-Roads and Pollocksville. He arrived at Young's Cross-Roads about 7.30 p. m., and after pushing a small force of cavalry across the White Oak River to capture one of the enemy's pickets, which was not accomplished, we at once commenced to build the bridge over the river, which was finished at 12.30 a. m., whereupon the cavalry, one section of artillery, and about 150 men Ninth Vermont Volunteers (transported in wagons) at once crossed and pushed on toward Jacksonville. When we reached a point about ten miles from the White Oak River our advance captured two of the enemy's pickets. About five miles from Jacksonville we met a company of the enemy's cavalry strongly posted on the west bank of Big Northeast Creek; after a slight skirmish, in which Captain Graham's company performed the most conspicuous part, the enemy was completely routed, leaving one of their killed upon the ground; so rapid was his flight, which he had been prepared to make (being fully

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