War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0780 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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that this is all the artillery I have, and this is a dangerous point of the line. I respectfully request that this matter be attended to, and that more mortars be sent me, if possible; I also ask that some of the miners be sent here for the purpose of sinking the listening galleries.

The following list of casualties is respectfully submitted: Gracie's brigade, wounded, 4. Ransom's brigade, killed, 3; wounded 4. Wise's brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 4. Total, 4 killed and 12 wounded.

Respectfully, &c.,

B. R. JOHNSON,

Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON'S DIVISION, July 14, 1864.

COLONEL: General Elliott occupied his former position last night, relieving General Gracie; nothing of interest has been reported this morning; the picket-line of Colonel Goode, commanding Wise's brigade, which runs across the front of the line, by which the enemy are approaching our works, was connected and strengthened last night.

The following casualties are respectfully submitted: Gracie's brigade, wounded, 2. Wise's brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3. Ransom's brigade, killed, 4; wounded, 10. Total, 5 killed and 15 wounded.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,

Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON'S DIVISION, July 15, 1864.

COLONEL: General Gracie relieved Wise's brigade at 8 p. m. yesterday. General Gracie reports from his own and the observations of others that the enemy have made no change in their positions, except to connect the rifle-pits on the left of his right regiment. They threw mortar shells into his lines at intervals of ten minutes nearly all night, without inflicting much injury, however, General Elliott and Colonel Faison report nothing of interest. The losses and annoyance which the enemy occasion in my lines are simply due, in my opinion, to a want of proper ammunition; from necessity, no doubt. So far as appliances with this army are concerned, we are husbanding our ammunition-that is, men or ammunition; one or the other-the enemy compel us to sacrifice. This is the simple question with us: Which shall we expend, human life or ammunition? We have none of the former material to spare, and the supply of it for future purposes is necessarily limited; of material for manufacturing the latter nature affords a bountiful supply. So far as I am informed, human energy and toil is all that is required to furnish us ammunition enough to give us daily immense advantages over the enemy. Surely this energy and toil can be supplied, if the proper officers are duly aroused to the necessity for their action and of the great responsibility which is resting on them. I refer to the officers whose duty it is to see that the ammunition is