War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0777 Chapter LII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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sion that my division is, perhaps, the only one that is keeping up sentined posts in rear of our line, at least I have failed to observe either patrols or sentinels from the provost guard of other divisions. I would respectfully urge that my inspector be relieved from his present duties with the provost guard, by a provost-marshal regularly detailed from the supernumerary or other officers of the line. Under the present system I regard my division inspector as entirely useless to me as a staff officer. By instructions from the Inspector-General he is not permitted to come forward to my headquarters near the line, yet his time seems imperfectly employed; practically the present system only removes the inspectors and their men from the dangerous vicinities. The number of staff officers allowed to a division commander is barely sufficient for duty on the line, and I feel very much the want of the services of my acting inspector.

The following list of casualties is respectfully submitted: Elliott's brigade, wounded, 1. Ransom's brigade, wounded, 1. Wise's brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 1. Total, 1 killed and 3 wounded.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,

Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT.

HEADQUARTERS JOHNSON'S DIVISION, July 8, 1864.

COLONEL: In obedience to instructions from department headquarters the pickets were kept on the alert last night, and scouts sent out. They report that no increase or diminution of the enemy could be perceived. The palisades and abatis in front of Wise's brigade and Ransom's also will be completed to-night. Colonel Goode, commanding Wise's brigade, reports that the enemy have thrown up a work in the railroad cut. He is unable to determine whether it is intended for a battery [or] as a connection for their rifle-pits. The unusual quietude prevailing in the Yankee lines portends, as all agree, some new movement of the enemy. If this movement is being made at all, it is being executed with consummate skill, and, as a consequence, may be fruitful of most serious results. Occupying as my command does a position opposite to the center of the enemy's front, it is impossible to determine accurately what the enemy are doing; their wagons are seen this morning coming to and going out from their lines as usual, and men on foot and on horseback are passing leisurely about, yet the picket-firing is very light and the fire from our artillery has failed to elicit a response from batteries of the enemy that have never failed before, yet the enemy have fired this morning from two batteries. With all due deference I would suggest that it appears to me that, with the James River for a base, the only practicable movement for the enemy is to turn or crush our left flank, and that this is the movement which, I skillfully executed before we are advised, is most deeply to be apprehended.

I submit the following list of casualties for the last twenty-four hours: Ransom's brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3. Elliott's brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 3. Wise's brigade, killed, 1; wounded, 6. Total, 3 killed and 12 wounded.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,

Major-General.

Colonel G. W. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.