War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0751 Chapter LII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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of Charles City Court-House. They left their dead and wounded on the field and along the route. Great credit is due to General Hampton and his command for their handsome success.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR,

Richmond, Va.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, June 25, 1864.

SIR: General W. H. F. Lee pursued the enemy's cavalry which advanced along the South Side Railroad. He had a skirmish on the 22nd near Dinwiddie Court-House, and the next day struck their column in flank near Blacks and Whites, cutting in two and getting possession of the road by which they were moving toward Nottoway Court-House. The road was held after an engagement which continued from 12 m. until dark, the enemy making repeated attempts to break through and rejoin his advance. He withdrew from General Lee's front and daylight on the 24th, leaving his dead and wounded on the field, taking the road to Hungarytown and Keysville. General Lee is still following them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR,

Richmond, Va.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, June 26, 1864.

SIR: The enemy has been quiet to-day in our front. A dispatch dated 25th was received this morning from Captain Farinholt, commanding at Staunton River bridge, expressing his confidence of being able to protect it. This afternoon General W. H. F. Lee reports that he attacked the enemy near Staunton River bridge yesterday afternoon and drove him until dark. He also states that the enemy was signally repulsed at the bridge the same evening and retreated this morning, leaving about thirty of his dead on the field.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR,

Richmond, Va.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, June 28, 1864.

SIR: The enemy has been engaged to-day apparently in strengthening his lines in front of Petersburg, advancing them at some points. His cavalry, after being repulsed at Staunton River bridge on the afternoon of the 25th, retired in the direction of Christianville, where they encamped that night. The next morning they continued their march