War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0665 Chapter LII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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8- 10- 10- 13- 24 30- 4 100-

inch inch inch inc - pound 1/2- pound

siege sieg sea- h po er inch er

morta e coas sea un Parro siege Parro

rs. mort t - de tt guns. tt

Station. ars. mort coa r guns. guns.

ars st Sa

mor wy

tar er

s gu

ns

Battery near - - - - - 145 - -

Fort Brady

Fort Brady - - - - - - 425 39

Dutch Gap 2,379 - - - - - - 182

Battery - - 460 - 10 - - 309

Sawyer

Battery - - - - - - 607 218

Spofford

Battery - - 171 - - - - 255

Wilcox and

Parsons

Battery - - - - - - - -

Drake

Battery - - - - - - - -

Carpenter

Battery - - - - - 86 - -

Anderson

Battery - - - - - 14 - -

Pruyn

Redoubt - - - - - - - -

Dutton

Battery - - - - - - - -

Burpee

Fort - - - - - - - -

Converse

Battery near - - - 173 - - - -

Numbers 4.

Battery - - - - - 1,741 - -

Numbers 4.

Battery 2,546 - - - - 303 - -

Numbers 5

Battery near - - - - - - - -

Fort

McGilvery

and Battery

Numbers 9.

Battery 1,897 - - - - - - -

Numbers 10

Battery - - - - - - -

Numbers 12 2,530

Fort Morton - 621 - - - - 640 -

Battery - - - - - - 879 -

Numbers 17

Battery 444 - - - - - - -

Numbers 20

Fort 14 - - - - - 180 -

Sedgwick

Total. 9,810 621 631 173 10 2,289 2,731 1,003

The aggregate number of rounds fired during these three months was thus 26,912, amounting to about 545 tons of iron. The total expenditure of ammunition from the beginning of the campaign to October 31 was 44,973 rounds, amounting to 870 tons of iron. Upon the Petersburg lines the firing has been so frequent as to render it difficult to select special instances for mention. At all hours of the day and night sudden artillery battle have occurred, often involving the entire line and demanding the expenditure of many tons of ammunition. This has usually arisen from the position of the right of our line, which is necessarily enfiladed from the Chesterfield Heights, and advantage that has given the rebel batteries there a strong temptation to open fire.

It is beyond a doubt that our practice, especially in mortars, is superior to theirs, and these fights have thus uniformly terminated by our silencing them. Upon the occasion of their exploding a mine near Battery 12, on August 5, an unusually heavy fire occurred, as also at other times when they attempted to interfere with the use of our military railroad or we tried to interrupt their working parties or to stop picket-firing by shelling Petersburg. General Butler's canal at Dutch Gap has also been the scene of much firing.

On August 13, just after the work began, the rebel navy came down, and, in conjunction with the Howlett house batteries and some field guns on Cox's Hill, opened a very heavy concentric fire upon the gap from an are of about 170 degrees. My James River batteries were very active and finally succeeded driving off the rams and silencing the Howlett house battery so effectually that the experiment was not repeated. About August 20, however, the rebels planted some Coehorn mortars in a secure spot northwest of the canal within good range, and since that time have kept up a desultory fire upon the gap, doing very little damage, however, owing to the want of skill in serving the mortars. Not one in a hundred of their shells have fallen in the canal, where good