War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0616 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LII.

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and it was impossible to withdraw more than one gun at a time. As the last gun was leaving the field the two wheel horses were killed. Lieutenant Dennison at once unlimbered and endeavored to drag off the piece by hand. Having no particularly designated supports, he called for assistance from the regiment nearest him (the Tenth New York Cavalry), which was promptly given, but it was too late. The enemy were within a few yards of the gun, and it was impossible to approach it. Lieutenant Dennison did everything in his power to save his gun, and gallantly stood by it to the last, having one horse killed under him and another wounded. I attribute the loss of the gun to the fact that the enemy could advance under excellent cover to within short rifle range of the position we occupied, to the killing of the two wheel horses, and to the want of a regularly designated support.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. RANDOL,

Captain, First U. S. Artillery.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION CAVALRY, August 3, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded.

J. IRVIN GREGG,

Colonel, Commanding Second Division Cavalry.

No. 227. Report of Asst. Surg. Elias J. Marsh, U. S. Army, of operations July

19-30.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION, OFFICE OF SURGEON IN CHIEF, February 16, 1865.

Bvt. Lieutenant Colonel T. A. McPARLIN, U. S. Army,

Medical Director, Army of the Potomac:

DOCTOR: I have the honor respectfully to render the following report of the operations of the Medical and Hospital Department and Ambulence Service of this division from July 19 to December 31, 1864.

E. J. MARSH,

Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Army, Surgeon in Chief of Division.

REPORT.

On July 19, 1864, I reported for duty as acting surgeon in chief of the Second Division, Cavalry Corps, in pursuance of Special Orders, No. 169, headquarters Cavalry Corps, July 15, 1864, Surgeon Phillips, First New Jersey Cavalry, the surgeon in chief of division, being absent on sick leave.

The division consisted of the following troops: First Brigade-First New Jersey, First Massachusetts, First Pennsylvania, Sixth Ohio, Tenth New York, and Battery A, Second U. S. Artillery; Second Brigade - First Maine, Second, Fourth Eighth, Thirteenth, Sixteenth Pennsylvania, and Battery I, First U. S. Artillery. The division was encamped between Light-House Point and City Point on both sides of the Telegraph road. With few exceptions all the troops were encamped in the woods, some on high ground, some on lower, but the long continued dry weather had exhausted all the moisture from the surface of the earth, and the extreme heat and dust made the shelter of the woods