War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0445 Chapter LII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 27, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: After careful study of my position in view of the operations which I am to support in General Burnside's front, as well as the holding the left, both combine to convince me that I cannot well abandon any part of my line without giving up all of it, and that then the best co-operation I could afford with my artillery would be lost. The line as now fortified is pretty strong. I propose to make the following disposition of my troops:

First. General Crawford's division to hold from the plank road around to the left. It is all in position, though scarcely at present in contact with the enemy. It is 4,336 strong; one brigade in and around the large redoubt, one brigade (Baxter's) in and around the small redoubt, one brigade on picket. These are all available for the defense of the left, and in case we wish to attack on the front, Baxter's could be calculated upon being withdrawn.

Second. General Griffin's division, 4,979 strong, will, I think, by putting them all in one line, hold the front now occupied by it and a portion of General Ayres.'

Third. General Ayres' division, 4,758 strong, will then all be in reserve, either for attack or defense.

Fourth. General Cutler, 1,959 strong, on the left of General Burnside, has a front so narrow as to have something over two lines of battle, the rear one of which can be withdrawn in the daytime. I propose to let this remain as a support to General Burnside, to be called away if needed to the left after our other reserves are exhausted. I probably can send 3,000 men to re-enforce our left when needed.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 27, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I have 1,900 men in working details to-day, which will considerably diminish the number I can count upon to send off suddenly to any other place. I think we should suspend the siege order for the present.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 27, 1864.

Major-General WARREN:

General McIntosh, commanding cavalry brigade picketing on the left, reports that the statement made respecting 500 infantry on the plank road is entirely unfounded. That being so, as to siege-works going on are chiefly those for the secure approach to the batteries, the commanding general [thinks] that they might be continued.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.