War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0413 Chapter LII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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ion in their retreat. Thence one was brought in by the bearer to our own line. Another bearer was killed by the enemy in their attack upon these works. The third color bearer returned to his regiment without his colors and with the following account of his conduct: He says that on first reaching the breast-works he planted his colors by the side of the Sixty-ninth New York. On suggestion from the Sixty-ninth color bearer he left to find his own regiment. Went a few feet rearward and lay down behind a pile of wood. The enemy attacking, he rose to retreat and seized his colors to bring with him, but the staff being entangled he could not free it and came off without it. Later he was told that our forces held those works and he went back to find his colors, but found the rebels in the works and had to escape. That he was quite demoralized will appear from his remarks to his commanding officer when examined in relation to his conduct, to this effect: that he thought it best even to the loss of the colors to save himself for some future service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS H. TALBOT,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding First Maine Artillery, June 22.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

HDQRS. SEVENTH REGIMENT NEW JERSEY VOLUNTEERS, In the Field, June 26, 1864.

[Lieutenant W. J. RUSLING,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:]

SIR: I respectfully beg leave to submit the following statement in reference to the loss of the national colors belonging to this regiment on the afternoon of June 22, 1864:

Learning that the troops upon the right and left of my command had fallen back I faced my command to the right and attempted to retreat in order, but the enemy suddenly appearing and pouring a volley into my ranks caused considerable confusion, in the midst of which the colors were borne off toward our first line of breast-works, since which time nothing has been heard of them. The color bearer and guard, likewise a part of my command, accompanied the colors and are still missing.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS C. THOMPSON,

Captain, Commanding Seventh New Jersey Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND CORPS, June 26, 1864.

Captain THOMAS C. THOMPSON,

Commanding Seventh New Jersey Volunteers, Third Brigade:

CAPTAIN: You will immediately place the color bearer of your national colors (the missing one) under arrest, and prefer charges against him for misbehavior before the enemy.

By command of Brigadier-General Mott:

WM. P. SHREVE,

Lieutenant, Asst. Commissary of Musters, and Actg. Asst. Adjt. General