War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0330 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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their position could be executed. No change of position, however, short of coming back to their old line or the advance of the Sixth Corps could have rendered them safe. I attribute the loss of prisoners to the position in which we were placed by swinging forward. At the same time it must be admitted that the troops engaged did not meet the attack with the vigor and determination which they would have shown at an earlier period of the campaign. Loss of commanding and other officers, exhaustion and other causes have so affected the three concerned in these operations, Second, Third and Fourth Brigades, that they cannot just now be relied on to meet critical emergencies with much determination and spirit. I had hardly got my First Brigade into position in the rifle-pits before it was smartly attacked. The enemy were repulsed.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANCIS C. BARLOW,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

Lieutenant-Colonel WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Corps.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SECOND CORPS,

June 25, 1864.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that I was with my command in the affair of June 22. I was at the point where the skirmishing began-in front of that part of my advanced line which made a return. Our skirmishers drove back the enemy from the front of this return. I ordered the return to be prolonged by a skirmish line, and, the firing having cease, I went to my reserve brigade to change its position and sent orders to my first line to make proper changes of front. The first line broke and came out while I was with the second line. The thing took place without any warning to me and entirely unexpectedly. It was all over in a few minutes and the men were out of the woods. I did not then, and do not now, think there was a large force of the enemy, but our men were disconcerted by receiving and hearing a fire in their rear and on their flank. I did not see the enemy and cannot speak of their numbers from observation. Reports come to me of "overwhelming numbers" and " three lines of battle," but I do not believe them, In the thick woods it was impossible to tell what the force of the enemy was unless you were among them.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANCIS C. BARLOW,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

Lieutenant-Colonel WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of my division at deep Bottom in July and august, * 1864:

At 4 p. m. of July 26 the division marched with the rest of the corps for Deep Bottom During the night we crossed the pontoon bridge at that point, and massed in a concealed position on the north bank of the James River, near the earth-works held by Foster's brigade. the march James River, near the earth-works held by Foster's brigade. The march was a severe one and the roads in some places bad, and considerable falling out occurred.

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*For report of operations in August, see Vol. XLII, Part I.

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