War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0151 Chapter LII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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seems to me it can be done, as we shall take the infantry fire quite obliquely. This done the advance upon the main hill will not be difficult. I think it would pay you to go to General Burnside's position. You can see in a moment, and it is as easy to communicate with me as by telegraph. It will be some time before we can hear from Crawford.

Respectfully.

G. K. WARREN.

Major-General.

35.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS.

July 30, 1864-8 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I sent your dispatch to General Crawford with directions to do what he could. He says "the lead-works are over a mile from the angle of my picket-line. I do not think an attack upon the enemy's works at or near that point at all practicable with the force I can spare. I can make a demonstration if it is desired. The cavalry are moving and I will have my left uncovered." He sent word he will await further orders. He [is] so far off that I do not think it well to wait anything more he can do, and I renew my suggestion that you take a look at things from General Burnside's headquarters, and direct me either to go in with Burnside or go around to my left with Ayres' division and I do the other thing.

G. K. WARREN.

Major-General.

36.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

July 30, 1864-8.45 a.m.

Major-General WARREN.

Commanding Fifth Corps:

Your dispatch is received. The major-general commanding directs that you go in with Burnside, taking the two-gun battery. The movement on the left need not be carried further than reconnaissance to see in what force the enemy is holding his right. The cavalry are ordered to move up on your left, and to keep up connection.

A. A. HUMPHREYS.

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

37.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS.

July 30, 1864-9.15 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

Just before receiving your dispatch to assault the battery on the left of the crater occupied by General Burnside, the enemy drove his troops out of the place and I think now hold it. I can find no one who knows for certainly or seems willing to admit, but I think I saw a rebel battle-flag in it just now, and shots coming from it this way. I am, therefore, if this [be] true, no more able to take the battery now than I was this time yesterday. All our advantages are lost. I await further instructions, and am trying to get at the condition of affairs for certainty.

G. K. WARREN.

Major-General.