War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0040 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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Special orders by Lieutenant-General Grant prescribing allowance of transportation and camp and garrison equipage.

ORDERS,

OFFICE OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER,

ARMIES OPERATING AGAINST RICHMOND,

No. 8

City Point, Va., June 29, 1864.

The following special orders, issued by the lieutenant-general commanding Armies of the United States, are printed for distribution to officers of the quartermaster's department on duty with the "Armies operating against Richmond:"

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES.

Numbers 44.

City Point, Va., June 28, 1864.

I. The following orders, prescribing the means the means of transportation, camp and garrison equipage, for the armies in the field operating against Richmond are published:

1. For the headquarters of the lieutenant-general commanding the Armies of the United States, in the field, and major-generals commanding separate armies, such wagons, light spring-carriages, saddle-horses, and camp equipage as may be deemed necessary from time to time, to be assigned by the chief quartermaster at general headquarters.

2. For the headquarters of an army corps, two wagons or eight pack-mules for baggage, &c., one two-horse wagon, one two-horse spring-wagon, and ten extra saddle-horses for contingent wants; two wall-tents for the personal use and office of the commanding general; one wall-tent for every two officers of his staff.

3. For the headquarters of a division, one wagon or five pack-mules for baggage, &c., one two-horse spring-wagon, one two-horse wagon, and five extra saddle-horses for contingent wants; one wall-tent for the personal use and office of the commanding general; one wall-tent for every two officers of his staff.

4. For the headquarters of a brigade, one wagon or five pack-mules for baggage, one two-horse spring- wagon, and extra saddle-horses for contingent wants; one wall-tent for the personal use and office of the commanding general; one wall-tent for every two officers of his staff.

5. The allowance of wagons and pack-mules to officers detached; to every three company officer when detached or serving without wagons, one pack-mule; to every staff officers when not attached to any headquarters, one pack-mule; to every ten staff officers when serving similarly, one wagon or four pack-mules.

6. These wagons and pack-mules will include transportation for all personal baggage, mess-chests, cooking utensils, desks, papers, &c. The weight of officers' baggage in the field, specified by army regulations, will be reduced so as to bring it within the foregoing schedule.

All excess of transportation camp and garrison equipage, now with the army corps, divisions, brigades, regiments, or batteries, over the allowance herein prescribed, will be immediately turned into the quartermaster's department, at the general depot at City Point.

7. Commissary stores and forage will be transported in the supply trains. When they are not convenient of access, and when troops act in detachments, the quartermaster's department will assign wagons or pack-mules for that purpose, but the baggage of officers or troops, or camp equipage, will not be carried in the wagons or on the animals so assigned.

8. For each regiment of infantry, cavalry, or battalion of heavy artillery: for baggage, camp equipage, &c., two wagons; three wall-tents for field and staff; one shelter-tent for every other commissioned officer; one shelter-tent for every two non-commissioned officers, soldiers, servants, and camp followers.

9. For each battery: for personal baggage, mess-chest, cooking utensils, desks, papers, &c., one wagon; two wall-tents for officers; shelter-tents, same allowance as for infantry and cavalry regiments.

10. For the artillery and small-arm ammunition train; the number of 12-pounder guns multiplied by 122 and divided by 112; the number of rifled guns multiplied by 50 and divided by 140; the number of 20-pounder guns multiplied by 2, and the number of 4 1/2-inch guns multiplied by 2 1/2, will give the number of wagons allowed.

The number of guns in horse batteries, multiplied by 100 and divided by 140, will give the wagons allowed.