War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0036 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA., AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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ourselves. Of course there are matters about which I cannot make inquiries, but what I have above reported is the general sense of what I have above reported is the general sense of what seems to be the opinion of fair-minded and zealous officers. For instance, I know that General Wright has said to a confidential friend that all of Meade's attacks have been made without brains and without generalship. The subject came to pretty full discussion at Grant's headquarters last night on occasion of a correspondence between Meade and Wilson. The Richmond Examiner charges Wilson with stealing not only negroes and horses, but silver plate and clothing on his raid, and Meade, taking the statement of the Examiner for truth, reads Wilson a lecture and calls on him for explanations. Wilson denies the charges of robing women and churches, and hopes Meade will not be ready to condemn his command because its operations have excited the ire of the public enemy. This started the conversation in which Grant expressed himself quite frankly as to the general trouble with Meade and his fear that it would become necessary to relieve him. In such event he said it would be necessary to put Hancock in command.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable E. M. STANTON.

CITY POINT, VA., July 7, 1864-8.30 a.m.

Nothing of importance since yesterday morning. The firing on Smith's and Burnside's lines was pretty constant during the day and night, and is active this morning. Drought continues.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON.

Secretary of War.

CITY POINT, VA. July 7, 1864-9 a.m.

(Received 8.30 p.m.)

An intelligent refugee, who came into our lines by way of Reams' Station, reports that the rebels are at work repairing the Weldon railroad. They have a large wagon train running from the break on the south toward Richmond by way of Dinwiddie Court-House. The same refugee says that as soon as Atlanta is taken Alabama will quit the Confederacy.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON.

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS IN THE FIELD,

City Point, Va., July 8, 1864-9.30 a.m. (Received 3.15 p.m.)

Nothing of much importance this morning. Firing pretty active in the trenches yesterday, but without consequence. Directions have been given to make regular siege approaches to the rebel lines. General Meade reports that Burnside's mine will prove of no value. He thinks the best place to work at is the salient angle on the Jerusalem plank road in Warren's front. This is the point which Barnard proposed to assault, as I reported several days since. We had a trifling shower yesterday, without effect on the drought.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable EWIN M. STANTON.

Secretary of War.