War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0033 Chapter LII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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A good deal of sickness from the extreme heat is reported from both Smith's and Meade's commands, in front of Petersburg. Weather cool this morning, but no rain.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

CITY POINT, VA. July 4, 1864-12.30 p.m.

(Received 6.15 a.m. 5th.)

Though General Grant fully acquiesced in your observations respecting General Barnard, still I deem it exceedingly desirable that the latter should be recalled from him. His advice tends to blunder and injury. General Meade is less positive than yesterday in his belief that Early is here. Deserters reported him here, but Meade states that he has captured no men from him (Early's) command.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON.

Secretary of War.

CITY POINT, VA, July 4, 1864-1 p.m.

(Received 6.15 a.m. 5th.)

General Barnard has laid before General Grant a memorandum explaining various plans for immediate operations, and concluded with an elaborate recommendation of an assault upon the key of Petersburg, which is a strong earth-work in front of Warren. It stands at the angle above the rebel lines on the east of the town which run pretty nearly north and south, joining those on the south whose general direction is about east and west. Barnard proposes to make very careful preparations to concentrate the fire of at least 100 cannon upon the point, and to attack with very heavy masses of men. I do not think that General Grant is much inclined to this idea, but he has sent to ask Meades' opinion about it. All our experience shows that with the mass of Lee's army to defend the works assailed they cannot be carried, and that the attempt, if made with vigor, would cost us at least 15,000 men.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON.

Secretary of War.

CITY POINT, VA., July 4, 1864-4 p.m.

(Received 5.55 a.m. 5th.)

The Richmond Examiner of Saturday claims that they have taken 500 prisoners from Wilson's command, including 250 wounded, 16 cannon, and between 500 and 700 negroes of all sizes and sexes, 35 wagons, 33 ambulances, and a great train of carriages and buggies. Many of the negroes were dressed in the finery of their masters and mistresses. The captured soldiers were loaded, according to the Examiner, with stolen watches, silverware, and ladies' and children's clothing. That paper argues, in a bitter article two columns long that they ought not to be treated as prisoners of war, but as bandits and assassins. It seems

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