War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0019 Chapter LII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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Bridge also, finds no force of any moment before him. We have reports from deserters that Beauregard is intrenched at Malvern Hill. Hancock and Warren are to move direct to Wilcox's; Wright and Burnside to Charles City. Hancock will reach his destination before dark. The army will cross the James at Fort Powhatan. There are strong indications that Lee is moving troops to Petersburg.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

GENERAL BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS, June 14, 1864 - 2.20 p. m.

(Received 2 a. m. 15th.)

Wright's corps reached the James River last night opposite Fort Powhatan. Burnside camped on the other side of the Chickahominy. Warren camped at Saint Mary's Church. Both these corps are up before this time. The wagon train, with Ferrero's division, reached the Chickahominy at the Windsor Shades, but did not cross, because they did not have enough bridge material. The deficiency has been supplied. Butler's engineers had begun work for the pontoon bridge at Fort Powhatan before our arrival, and are now aided by heavy details from Hancock's corps. It is a pretty heavy job to corduroy the march, which id fully half a mile wide, and quite deep. When we left Wilcox's Whart at 9 o'clock this morning there were three steam-boats there to begin ferrying Barlow's division. No ferry-boat had yet appeared; however, the crossing will be made with all practicable rapidity, the troops crossing on boats, and the bridge being used for the trains only. The weather is cloudy, threatening rain, but I think we shall get everything out of the Chickahominy bottom upon the highlands along the James River before any trouble from that source. We know nothing of Lee's movements. He has not yet sent troops to Petersburg. General Grant desires me to inquire whether Quartermaster Holabird, at New Orleans, has been relieved. He has very bad reports concerning him. He also wishes that you would send him $ 500,000 in Confederate money for use in a cavalry expedition, on which he proposes to pay for everything taken. Your dispatch respecting Barnard was received and communicated. There is no reason for anxiety on that subject.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS,

June 15, 1864 - 8 a. m. (Received 9.50 p. m.)

All goes on like a miracle. Pontoon bridge at Fort Powhatan finished at 2 a. m. Artillery trains instantly began crossing. Hancock's corps is nearly all landed by ferry at Wind-Mill Point; last of it will be over by 10 a. m. Hancock moves our instantly for Petersburg to support Smith's attack on that place, which was to have been made at daylight. General Warren will next be ferried, followed by Burnside and Wright. None of the boats sent by General Halleck, on General Grant's order, have arrived. The great wagon train had not yet begun to come up from the Windsor Shades, the pontoons sent back there having been delayed. Wilson's cavalry pickets now extend from White Oak Swamp