War of the Rebellion: Serial 080 Page 0013 Chapter LII. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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and 4 guns. Our successes are being followed up. Our forces drew out from within fifty yards of the enemy's intrenchments at Cold Harbor, made a flank movement of an average of about fifty miles march, crossing the Chickahominy and James Rivers, the latter 2,000 feet wide and 84 feet deep at point of crossing, and surprised the enemy's rear at Petersburg. This was done without the loss of a wagon or piece of artillery and with the loss of only about 150 stragglers, picked up by the enemy. In covering this move Warren's corps and Wilson's cavalry had frequent skirmishes with the enemy, each losing from 50 to 60 killed and wounded, but inflicting an equal, if not greater, loss upon the enemy. The Eighteenth Corps (Smith's) was transported from White House to Bermuda Hundred by water, moved our near to Petersburg the night of its arrival, and surprised or rather captured the very strong works northeast of Petersburg before sufficient force could be got in there by the enemy to hold them. He was joined the night following this capture by the Second Corps, which in turn captured more of the enemy's redoubts farther south, and this corps was followed by the Ninth, with the result above stated. All the troops are now up except two divisions covering the wagon trains, and they will be up to-night. The enemy in their endeavor to re-enforce Petersburg abandoned their intrenchments in front of Bermuda Hundred. They no doubt expected troops from north of the James River to take their place before we discovered it. General Butler took advantage of this and moved a force at once upon the railroad and plank road between Richmond and Petersburg, which I hope to retain possession of. Too much credit cannot be given the troops and their commanders for the energy and fortitude displayed during the last five days. Day and night have been all the same, no delays being allowed on any account.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.

CITY POINT, VA., June 23, 1864 - 9 a. m.

Yesterday and this morning have been consumed in extending our lines to the left to envelop Petersburg. The Second and Sixth Corps are now west of the Jerusalem plank road. Yesterday, in moving to this position, the two corps became separated. The enemy pushed out between them and caused some confusion in the left of the Second Corps, and captured 4 pieces of artillery. Order was soon restored and the enemy pushed back. This morning no enemy is found on the left. This will be pushed forward until the enemy is found. The Petersburg papers of yesterday state that Hunter has been routed and already 3,000 of his men have been captured.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.

CITY POINT, VA., June 24, 1864 - 9 a. m.

No special change or news to report for yesterday. The enemy showed himself in large force on our left in the evening, and General