War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0888 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter LI.

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for me to furnish any plan of my operations for the future, as so much must depend upon the movements of the enemy. The matter has been fully discussed between General Beauregard and myself. Inclosed please find a copy of a telegram sent to the War Department this morning.

J. B. HOOD,

General.

[Inclosure.]

TUSCUMBIA, November 4, 1864.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR:

Sherman seems to be concentrating his army at Huntsville and Decatur.

J. B. HOOD,

General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Tuscumbia, November 4, 1864.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Commanding, &c.:

In consequence of non-arrival of commissary supplies, I cannot hope to be able to make a general movement of the army before Monday next, but Lieutenant -General Lee will move his corps tomorrow to Shoal Creek.

J. B. HOOD,

General.

OFFICE INSP. OF FIELD TRANS., ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

Tuscumbia, November 4, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel A. H. COLE,

Chief of Field Transportation, Richmond:

COLONEL: We arrived here four days since, after a long and very fatiguing march made of over a month from Palmetto, Ga. Altogether I have never seen so hard a campaign upon troops and transportation; we marched nearly every day from twenty to twenty- five miles without feeding or watering; indeed, we had positive orders not to stop for water until the day's march was finished, which was generally in the night; many animals were even neglected by the negro teamsters. The result of this is that all of our animals are fagged down and many rendered utterly useless; or delay here is caused by this state of affairs. The supply trains at one time moved for seven days without unharnessing and did not average one feed per day. Upon our arrival here General Hood issued an order directing that all wagons used as baggage wagons be converted into supply trains for ordnance and commissary stores. Every officer of the quartermaster, inspector, and in fact of every other department not being at something else, was directed to see the order enforced. It will take a first rate Philadelphia lawyer to sift out this conglomeration of trains, and tell what transfers have been made. Everything is in greater confusion than I have ever seen it. With the addition of these baggage wagons to the supply trains, I suppose we will be able to transport all necessary supplies. Upon inspection by an officer of our department and one of General Hood's inspectors it war found that 360 artillery horses would be required to supply the places of those