War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0760 Chapter LI. KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA.

Search Civil War Official Records

NASHVILLE, November 12, 1864 -12. 30 p. m.

Colonel SIPES,

Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, Columbia:

Be prepared to unload twenty pontoon-boats from the cars on arrival. They are now near here. You can then repair from bridge.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CORPS,

Thompson's Station, November 12, 1864.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Nashville:

The artillery horses have arrived and, though not quite enough, will enable me to move, and I will march to Columbia in the morning unless you have other orders. The break in the railroad will be about seven miles from Columbia, and if we need more supplies before the repairs are completed the trains should take them by rail to the break, and our baggage wagons can then supply us while we are stationary. The railroad men here have told me they thought it would require more than a week to put the road in running order to Columbia. Requisitions are in for ordnance and ordnance stores for both infantry and artillery, which I hope the proper staff officers will look after. The artillery especially need coal and horseshoes. I have asked General Stanley to keep me advised of movements in his vicinity.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.

THOMPSON'S, November 12, 1864.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Nashville:

Since sending last dispatch I have seen the man in charge of the construction train, who says they will complete the repairs to Columbia by to-morrow. Will this make any difference in your orders?

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DISTRICT OF Kentucky,

Lexington, Ky., November 12, 1864.

THOMAS E. BRAMLETTE,

Governor of Kentucky, Frankfort, Ky.:

DEAR SIR: Your favor of 10th instant was duly received. It was not my intention in writing the dispatch therein referred to make any insinuations or innuendoes. The reference in the words "when the civil authorities make no effort to suppress disloyalty the military must and will" was simply this: For months past Wolford, Jacob, Huston, and others have been making speeches in different parts of the State, reviling the administration, and not only that, which would be overlooked, but also endeavoring by their remarks to discourage enlistments, and thus to weaken the power of the Government in this