War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0646 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA. AND N. GA. Chapter LI.

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ROME, November 5, 1864-6. 15 p. m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

The following is the information obtained from prisoners captured near Cedartown and Cava Spring by a reconnoitering party sent out by your direction to-day. All or part of Jackson's and Wheeler's cavalry in and about Jacksonville, with brigades pushed out on various roads to watch your movements. In the event you go south, one corps is to keep in your advance, laying waste the country; another corps to follow in your rear. In the event go north or follow Hood the whole force is to hang on your flanks and rear. These are said to be instructions from Beauregard. There are no forces of any size within twenty miles of here in any direction.

JNO M. CORSE,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Kingston, Ga., November 5, 1864.

General KILPATRICK,

Marietta, Ga.:

You will reorganize the cavalry at Atlanta without bringing it away, as it is needed there.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTIETH CORPS,

Atlanta, Ga., November 5, 1864.

Colonel ISRAEL GARRARD,

Commanding Cavalry DIVISION:

COLONEL: The major-general commanding desires that you send out early to-morrow morning scouting parties on each of the roads leading south and southeast from here. Our corps has moved out this afternoon about three miles on the McDonough road and is encamped there. The roads east of McDonough road, including the Decatur road, are the ones he desires to have reconnoitered.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. PERKINS,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

NASHVILLE, TENN., November 5, 1864-9. 30 p. m.

(Received 3 a. m. 6th.)

Major-General HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

Reports from Johnsonville, by telegraph, from Colonel Thompson, state that the enemy commenced crossing the Tennessee, about five miles above Johnsonville, this morning, with the cutter and gig of the gun-boat Undine, which they had hauled above the town on wagons, and two flat-boats, constructed by themselves. No shots were exchanged since early this morning, and the enemy were engaged in burying their dead on the opposite bank of the river. The gun- boats were in sight below the town, and several shots had been fired by them at the enemy's batteries, on the bank of the river, which prevented the