War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0634 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter LI.

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Sugar Creek or below to-morrow, with patrols on the Tennessee. I have kept Hatch here to watch for any cavalry that might come from the direction of Clifton and endeavor to interrupt our communications. Have you any suggestions to make? Wagner's DIVISION will be here to-night. Elk River takes men to the armpits. Please hurry up the entrenching tools.

D. S. STANLEY,

Major-General.

NASHVILLE, TENN., November 4, 1864-5. 30 p. m.

Major General D. S. STANLEY,

Pulaski:

Your two dispatches of this date are just received. I will se Mr. Anderson, superintendent of railroad here, and have him to send a railroad agent down to Pulaski. I will also direct a portion of the construction corps to proceed to Pulaski to make the platforms you need. Have you received my dispatch of this morning directing you to send General Hatch down to Bough's Factory via Leadington or Lexington? If you have not received that telegram I wish you to direct General Hatch to proceed to Bough's Factory, where General Croxton will report to him. This will enable General Croxton to concentrate his forces toward his left and General Hatch can cover the Florence and Lawrenceburg road and watch the country to the west, while General Croxton, with his own and Capron's command, can cover Florence and Athens road and watch the country up to Lamb's Ferry. With all this cavalry in your front I think the road will be perfectly clear for your wagon train to march from Stevenson to Pulaski instead of going by Decherd.

Acknowledge receipt.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

PULASKI, TENN., November 4, 1864-9. 30 p. m.

Major-General THOMAS:

Your dispatch of 5. 30 p. m. is received. Hatch will go to Lexington to-morrow and take command. Capron will follow if his horses are shod. It is too late to change the course of my train, as they are about Tantalon to-night. The roads via Decherd and Huntsville are about the same, with the advantage of Fayetteville bridge in favor of former. I have not heard of Croxton to-day. How is Sherman doing?

D. S. STANLEY,

Major-General.

NASHVILLE, TENN., November 4, 1864-11. 35 a. m.

Brigadier General R. S. GRANGER,

Decatur:

Send out as strong reconnoitering parties as you can raise, so as to give the impression to the enemy that you are watching them closely to follow them up. If they have withdrawn from the south bank of the river you might diminish your patrol along the river and thereby increase your reconnoitering parties.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.