War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0593 Chapter LI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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PADUCAH, KY., November 1, 1864.

Captain J. BATES DICKSON,

Lexington, Ky.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to request that intimation of the enemy's movements and the danger of Johnsonville may be forwarded to Nashville. I have taken the responsibility of detaining all boats at this place until the danger is over, as they certainly would be captured if they go up the Tennessee River.

S. MEREDITH,

Brigadier-General.

COLUMBUS, KY., November 1, 1864.

Major-General THOMAS:

A reliable scout has brought in the following information: He left Forrest's command last Sunday at Paris, Tenn., moving in the direction of Fort Heiman, on the Tennessee River. He reports his force at seventeen regiments, four battalions, all mounted, two 24- pounders, three 12-pounder howitzers, and four 6-pounders, field pieces, nine pieces in all. He thinks their intention is to blockade the Tennessee River at the mouth of Sandy with a portion of his command and move on Fort Donelson.

J. N. McARTHUR,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

COLUMBUS, KY., November 1, 1864.

Captain GRAHAM,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The scout returned this morning. He left Paris 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Forrest and Buford, with their commands, were there and moving in the direction of Fort Heiman. His force consists of seventeen regiments infantry, four battalions, and nine pieces of artillery, two of them 24-pounders. If you wish to see Houck let me know, and I will send him on first boat.

JAMES N. McARTHUR,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

SMITHLAND, KY., November 1, 1864.

Captain J. GRAHAM,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Two recruits of the Thirty-fourth New Jersey Volunteers just arrived. They started on the transport Venus, under Lieutenant Gibson, with fifteen other recruits from Johnsonville, on Sunday morning, Above Paris Landing they were fired into by musketry. Lieutenant Gibson returned the fire and had a running fight until opposite the landing, when they were opened on by three guns in battery. The captain of the Venus and three of the recruits of the Thirty-fourth New Jersey Volunteers were killed. The Venus was run ashore opposite the battery and surrendered at 4 o'clock. The two men here then

38 R R-VOL XXXIX, PT III