War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0489 Chapter LI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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NASHVILLE, TENN., October 28, 1864-9. 15 p. m.

Brigadier General R. S. GRANGER,

Decatur, Ala. ;

The gun-boats should be active in patrolling the river constantly. Judging from the conduct of your men to-day, I have no fears but that you can successfully resist any attack of the enemy against your position if you will keep on hand a sufficient supply of ammunition and provisions. look out for attempts to assault you early of mornings.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

DECATUR, ALA., October 28, 1864.

Major-General THOMAS:

The following dispatch has just been received:

Courier in from Claysville. Lieutenant Taylor reports that he patrolled the river down to Fort Deposit and up to Larkinsville Landing; saw no enemy. Captain Kingman, commanding at Brownsborough, has information for citizens that Mead was at New Market with 300 men, and was expecting more.

Can you not send some force to look after him! He may injure our roads and give us much trouble.

R. S. GRANGER,

Brigadier-Ger al.

HUNTSVILLE, October 28, 1864.

Major-General THOMAS:

The following dispatches are just received from a captain of gun- boat General Thomas, with the further information that he has left Whitesburg for Decatur:

U. S. STEAMER GENERAL THOMAS,

Off Hobson's Island, October 28, 1864.

Captain M. FORREST,

Commanding Eleventh District, MISSISSIPPI Squadron, Bridgeport:

SIR: Dispatches all received. Just from Fort Deposit. Saw no enemy since yesterday. I shall start for Decatur immediately, and if I can force the vessel over the bar you will hear from me this afternoon from Decatur. River rose one inch in the last twenty-four hours.

G. MORTON,

Acting Master, Commanding.

U. S. STEAMER GENERAL THOMAS,

October 28, 1864.

Colonel LYON,

Huntsville:

From latest information I an get the main force of the enemy has moved down the river, but I think they will attempt crossing at Guntersville or Fort Deposit. I think the later place, the river being narrow and a good artillery road for them to come on. Opposite this place is every appearance of fences being down for the moving of cavalry. I fired a canister at them, and could see them running through the corn-field. I should go to Decatur and be back here to-night; the river rose last night. Russell's brigade of cavalry is left at Guntersville and one corps at Warrenton.

G. MORTON,

Acting Master, Commanding.

W. P. LYON,

Colonel, Commanding Post.