War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0476 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter LI.

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To-night the gun-boat Numbers 11 will be at Ashton at 2 a. m., and I will have the Metropolitan there at that time to land the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry. Captain Bacon is very desirous that I remain a few days to attempt the solution of the mystery of their crossing. Should I not receive orders from you to the contrary, I shall be in Vicksburg Monday or Tuesday morning. Should you desire me to remain longer and scout the vicinity of Gaines' Landing I will need rations for 650 men for such time as you may designate. The hard bread drawn by the THIRD U. S. Colored Troops was so wormy that they could not eat it and were compelled to throw it away. This is one of the reasons our rations are always short on scouts.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. OSBAND,

Colonel, Commanding Cavalry Expedition.

[Indorsement.]

Colonel HARRIS:

Acknowledge. A steamer now in port. Tell him that we hear that 300 rebel cavalry crossed the river from the east side between Goodrich's and Skipwith's, and are probably after his forces. let him be on the alert. See that the dispatch is certainly delivered to Osband at the earliest moment. He need not remain out longer than Tuesday. Let him know that a Colonel Lee is on the east side above Goodrich's, or thereabouts, in some force. he is from Texas.

D[ANA].

ROME, GA., October 28, 1864.

(Received 10 a. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

Colonel W. Warner telegraphs me that he is notified he will be dismissed for premature publication of news. Warner is one of my very best officers, and is just appointed Colonel of a new regiment. You know my views on the subject of these publications. Still I ask that he be not dismissed. I know him to be a very superior officer, and anything he has done has resulted from the universal misconception of duty by volunteer officers in regard to such matters. I will pledge myself for his future good behavior. General Ransom is very ill of dysentery. I think he will die. He is being brought in on a lSHERMAN,

Major-General.

ROME, GA., October 28, 1864-8. 30 p. m.

(Received 12 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

The rebel army is now before Decatur, Ala. I think the place strong and can hold out, and that it will delay Beauregard till General Thom as can make his preparations. I have sent Stanley's corps to Chattanooga, and may also send Schofield's; but I do not want to go back myself with the whole army, as that is what the enemy wants. if you