War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0413 Chapter LI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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of judging among so many worthy men, all of whom can only be known to him by the record. But events and movements have followed each other so rapidly that my army commanders have not been able to attend to the matter, but have sent into my office the detached papers of each. These I herewith inclose, indorsed with my own individual opinion. I have not General Thomas' list, but will instruct him to send it direct from Nashville, where he now is. If necessary to promote to DIVISIONS and brigades the officers now exercising the rank of major-general and brigadier-general it be necessary to create vacancies, I do think the exigencies of the country would warrant the muster out of the same number of generals now on the list that have not done service in the past year.

The following persons should be promoted to the rank of major- general:

Army of the Cumberland: Brigadier General T. J. Wood, Brigadier General A. Baird. Bvt. Major General Jeff. C. Davis should be fully commissioned. Army of the Ohio: Brigadier General J. D. Cox to be major-general. Army of the Tennessee: Brigadier General Charles R. Woods, Brigadier General William B. Hazen, Brigadier General John M. Corse, and Brigadier General T. E. G. Ransom. All these are actual DIVISION commanders, men of marked courage, capacity, and merit, who are qualified to separate commands.

Among the worthy colonels aspiring to the rank of brigadier-general I can only name Colonel J. A. Williamson, Fourth Iowa; Colonel Thomas J. Harrison, Eighth Indiana Cavalry, and Colonel R. H. G. Minty, of Second Michigan Cavalry, who have long and well commanded brigades, and who seems to have no special friends to aid them to advancement.

I am, with respect, your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

GAYLESVILLE, ALA., October 24, 1864 - 8 p. m.

(Received 2. 45 p. m. 25th.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

We have heard of Sheridan's victory at Cedar Creek. We cannot afford to burn gunpowder, but our men can make up in yelling, which is just as good. We have pushed the enemy to Gadsden, and are now living on the country till the railroad is repaired, which will be done by Thursday, the 27th. I will send back all sick, wounded, and surplus property, ready to take up our baggage and march wherever it may seem best. General Wilson is here, and asks for time to make up a good cavalry force, but I will be governed by the movements of Beauregard. I send an order,* made by Beauregard on assuming command, which seems to be of enough importance to telegraph. Slocum reports all well at Atlanta. He has gathered near 2,000 wagon-loads of corn and forage. All my animals here are improving on the corn-fields of the Coosa, and you will observe my position at Gaylesville, Blue Pond, and a pontoon laid at Cedar Bluff, with a DIVISION at Alpine and Will's Valley head, is very good to watch the enemy about Gadsden and Blue Mountain. Beauregard announces his theorem to be to "drive Sherman out of Atlanta, which he still holds defiantly," and I dare him to the encounter, but am not willing to chase him all over creation.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

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* See Beauregard's address, October 17, p. 825.

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