War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0308 Chapter LI. KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA.

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wah to the Chattahoochee, communicating frequently by telegraph when practicable from time to time the state of affairs. The armies march from Resaca to-night and to-morrow.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. ELLIOTT,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Cavalry.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

October 16, 1864 - 11. 30 a. m.

General SHERMAN:

GENERAL: Our skirmishers have encountered a skirmish line of the enemy on the summit of Taylor's Ridge. General Osterhaus is feeling around to turn the enemy's left. One of our negro soldiers, escaped prisoner, reports two corps at La Fayette. My impression is that two corps passed over this road and that one went down the valley toward Villanow. The negro came over the ridge beyond the enemy's left. I do not think there is a large force on the ridge, probably a rear guard.

Respectfully,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General, Commanding.

NEAR VILLANOW, GA., October 16, 1864.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Military DIVISION of the Mississippi:

My signal officer reports the smoke and fires, apparently of a large force, from five to eight miles to the southwest of Ship's Gap.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Near Villanow, Ga., October 16, 1864.

Soldiers of the Army of the Tennessee:

We are accustomed to call our profession an honorable one, and are under every conceivable obligation to out country and ourselves to establish and maintain a reputation above reproach. I therefore call upon you to frown indignantly upon every mean action. To-day soldiers of our army entered houses and opened trunks, drawers, and boxes, utterly destroying everything they could lay their hands on. They took from women and children the last morsel of food. In some cases these things were done under the eyes of commissioned officers and in a manner as if it were a frolic. Such practices are simply dishonorable; they sully the purity of the noble cause for which we fight. I appeal to the good sense of this army to put a stop to actions which are either thoughtless or criminal, and must lower us in the estimation of all honorable men and have a tendency to undermine our Government. Pillaging is a crime prohibited by every law. Where military necessity requires it, supplies must be taken properly, in accordance with regulations and orders. Where a different custom prevails, divis-