War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0269 Chapter LI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

RESACA, October 14, 1864.

General W. T. SHERMAN:

Just received dispatch from Dalton. Cavalry dashed in there and captured 10 prisoners. Stewart's corps one mile and a half from there. Hood has divided his forces, one-half going toward the tunnel, tearing up the road; the other going toward Dug Gap.

E. M. McCOOK,

Brigadier-General.

P. S. -I am here collecting my troops. Stanley has passed toward Tilton. Reconnaissance of infantry and cavalry has gone to Snake Creek Gap.

Respectfully,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

2 P. M.

P. S. Numbers 2. -Report from reconnaissance to Snake Creek Gap, just received, states that a force of the enemy holds the gap. A prisoner says it is Lee's corps, and that there are twenty-eight pieces of artillery in position.

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

THREE MILES FROM DALTON, October 14, 1864.

Brigadier-General McCOOK,

Resaca:

GENERAL: The courier I first sent you has just reported, notifying me of the information he carried you, which information was incorrect. I sent you no such message; I sent you word, from all that I could learn the whole force of the enemy were at Dalton, and that I intended following them immediately, which I did, and found that Stewart's corps had moved from Tilton on the railroad, destroying it entirely as he went, arriving this a. m. at Dalton, where they joined Cheatham's corps, which arrived there yesterday afternoon. Arriving within one mile of Dalton I charged into the town and captured 15 prisoners and obtained the above information. The greater portion of the enemy, under Hood or Beauregard, moved toward Tunnel Hill, tearing up the railroad as they went. They were on the outskirts of the town when I dashed in; a force of cavalry and some infantry moved at the same time out the Dug Gap road. It seems from what I learn that this latter force intended forming a junction with Lee's corps, which I understand left Resaca yesterday evening and moved in the direction of La Fayette. Fearing being pursued by the enemy's cavalry I am falling back slowly. From Tilton I sent a lieutenant and twenty men to Spring Place, with orders to report any information direct to you, also Lieutenant Kerby, of the Seventh Kentucky, moved in another direction toward Dalton with similar orders.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, &c.,

JOHN M. BACON,

Captain, Fourth Kentucky Cavalry, Commanding.