War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0217 Chapter LI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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about of General Rousseau I do not know for certain, but suppose him to be moving in this direction. No news from courier carrying last dispatches for him to concentrate at Athens. Will communicate your orders to General Croxton as per last dispatch to General Rousseau.

JOHN C. STARKWEATHER,

Brigadier-General.

DECATUR, October 11, 1864.

Major-General THOMAS:

If the general thinks the force at Gadsden is coming this way this is an important point if in the hands of the enemy; pontoons will procure their passage over the river. The south shore is much the highest; the north side a deep, narrow lake running parallel with the river, and from 200 to 400 yards from it, and extending two miles. I would go within eight miles of Pulaski, so I could get there and advise you of the facts and await orders. I have had not command since I joined General Rousseau, except my own brigade. I presume all the troops are about Florence or Waterloo, except mine and Colonel Roper's detachment, about 1,600 men, which are somewhere between Waterloo and Columbia. I have marched near 400 miles in the last sixteen days. What shall I do? I ask in the spirit of a martyr. Any order you give I will try and execute.

JOHN T. CROXTON,

Brigadier-General.

SIXTEEN MILES WEST OF PULASKI,

October 11, 1864-11 a. m. (Via Pulaski.)

Major-General THOMAS:

I have just received a dispatch from General Johnson, dated the 9th, advising me that your ordered the command to remain it was, and directing me to return to Waterloo. I have sent a messenger to General Rousseau, at Florence, advising him of your order to cross the river, and what to do when he got there, and also that ten miles WEST of Florence [sic], and I was ordered to Columbia, and informed that they would move at once for Pulaski, which point I presume they have reached or will to-day. I met General Hatch early yesterday morning and presume he is now near Waterloo.

JOHN T. CROXTON,

Brigadier-General.

NASHVILLE, October 11, 1864.

Brigadier General John T. CROXTON:

(To be forwarded via Pulaski.)

You will move your command to some point sufficiently near your provisions at Athens to draw from that place, and also to enable you to get from the surrounding country forage sufficient to keep your animals in good condition, and at the same time sufficiently near the railroad to protect it from Decatur down as far as Eastport.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.