War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0211 Chapter LI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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officer in charge, Major Cramer, a gallant fellow, says he is waiting to see whether they will follow. They asked Garrard to you what he knew, which, in my opinion, though erroneous in detail, is substantially correct. I have worked hard to find out Hood's exact whereabouts and destination. Will let you know more to-night.

JNO M. CORSE,

Brigadier-General.

ROME, October 11, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Captain Peek, First Alabama Cavalry, I sent up the Summerville railroad WEST about 9; when near the Armuchee heard noise of infantry and artillery; dashed at a house where some officers were getting supper and took 1 prisoners and 3 negroes. This is the substance of a rigid examination of them (they are officers' servants and well posted): Hood crossed yesterday at Coosaville, Lee and Stewart took one road north, and Bate's and Cheatham's DIVISIONS went up a cross-road leading from the Alabama road into the Summerville road, where Captain Peek struck them. Cheatham is in command of Hardee's corps, the latter being absent. The corps is encamped on the Armuchee to-night, these black boys having left the camp few minutes before being captured to get some sirup for General Gordon's supper. They all say that Lee and Stwart are camped farther to the WEST on another and parallel road. Their ideas of the object of the movement are conflicting, one having heard his master speak of Dalton, and the others heard masters speak of Bridgeport as their destination. They all corroborate that Beauregard arrived at the army at Cave Spring, and was received with prolonged huzzas by the lines as he rode by. There is no question in my mind that the main portion of Hood's, or Beauregard's, is to-night between here and Summerville. I am largely indebted to the activity and gallantry of the officers of the First Alabama Cavalry in procuring information for me since here. General Elliott is here.

JNO M. CORSE,

Brigadier-General.

ROME, October 11, 1864.

General SHERMAN:

Your dispatches to General Elliott I have received and sent to him. The details upon which I based my telegram I did not give you fully. Will add that Captain Peek, who is a cool, resolute officer, saw roads badly cut by artillery, heard noise of infantry in camp, and saw some officers [come] out of a house near camp; they were there getting supper. Captured a negro servant of General Gordon, who commands a brigade in Cheatham's DIVISION, and a servant of Colonel Wyatt, of Twelfth Tennessee Infantry, and one other negro, with a private of SIXTEENTH Tennessee Infantry. These negroes were mounted on their master's horses. Were not in condition and knew nothing of the white man. I cross-examined them separately, and they substantially confirmed each other's story, besides corroborating the information I have received through scouts, spies, deserters, and escaped prisoners. Captain Peek has not yet been heard from. I further learn that the command took with them but two wagons to a regiment, and ambulance,