War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0156 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. G. A. Chapter LI.

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following dispatch; but by some oversight General Morgan's dispatches were not inclosed with his as stated. I suppose the substance of General Morgan's dispatches to be the same information which I have already communicated to you. General Morgan's skirmishing was at Shoal Creek bridge. Your dispatches of last night and this morning for General Rousseau were both received this morning and forwarded at once by special courier:

SHOAL CREEK, October 7, 1864.

Major-General THOMAS:

GENERAL: I forward dispatches of General Morgan, the substance of which was communicated to me five hours ago. I sent a dispatch to general Morgan this a. m. directing him to move down below Florence, where we are going now, and await your orders touching the subject of my telegram forwarded to Pulaski this a. m. We are entirely out of supplies, forage, and rations, and there is none of either in this country. On consulting with Generals Steedman and Johnson we have concluded to go below Florence, obtain supplies, recruit the stock, and be ready to do whatever you may desire. That section of country needs eating out a little at any rate. Nothing yet heard of General Washburn's forces. We shall scout for the enemy and try and capture whatever portion may be this side of the river.

L. H. ROUSSEAU,

Major-General.

Nothing new from below further than sent you.

Respectfully,

JOHN C. STARKWEATHER,

Brigadier-General.

PULASKI, October 8, 1864 - 5. 10 p. m.

Major B. H. POLK, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Last news from General Rousseau was at 1 p. m. October 7. He had communicated with General Morgan and all were to move below Florence and there await Major-General Thomas' orders, which I forwarded by special courier this morning. Had not heard of or from General Washburn; was out of supplies of all kinds. My scouts just in; two men were sent out to learn movements; they report hearing artillery firing last night, lasting nearly three hours; was in direction of Bainbridge Ferry; citizens confirm this report. Inform Major-General Thomas of the fact. No further news. All quiet here.

JOHN C. STARKWEATHER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CLARKSVILLE, October 8, 1864.

Major B. H. POLK, Assistant Adjutant-General:

General Lyon, with Cobb's battery (no guns), and Eighth Kentucky Infantry, 200 strong, crossed the north side of Cumberland last night. They go into Kentucky to disband and recruit. I captured one of them.

A. A. SMITH,

Colonel, Commanding Eighty-THIRD Illinois.

NASHVILLE, October 8, 1864.

Brigadier General JAMES D. MORGAN,

West Side of Shoud Creek, Ala., via Athens:

It is reported that Forrest has not yet crossed the river, being unable to do so, and was intending to cross at or near Clifton, with General