War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0119 Chapter LI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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1,000, while we lost only 300. Figth lasted six hours altogether. From Florence we hear that Morgan has Forrest cornered; has captured his transportation, and that the gun-boats prevent all retreat across the Tennessee. Between the gun-boats, Rousseau, Washburn, and Morgan, the negro - trader is in a bad way, and no good sight either to run or fight.

J. C. VAN DUZER.

DECATUR, October 6, 1864.

Major - General THOMAS:

The following dispatch just received:

ATHENS, October 6, 1864.

Two couriers sent to General Morgan have just returned, and

[say] impossible to cross Elk River. One courier just in; his comrade, with dispatches from the general, was drowned in crossing the Elk. He left Second DIVISION beyond Rogersville, party across Shoal Creek. Cavalry was skirmishing. Don't know what dispatches were.

A. B. WADE,

Lieutenant - Colonel Seventy-THIRD Indiana, Commanding.

Sent out a scout immediately to communicate with General Morgan.

R. S. GRANGER,

Brigadier - General.

HUNTSVILLE, October 6, 1864 - 9. 50 p. m.

General THOMAS:

The courier reported drowned in crossing Elk River is in. He lost the dispatches while crossing the river. He reports that two rebels were captured yesterday, who say that they had left Forrest at Lawrenceburg the night before, crossing south.

R. S. CRANGER,

Brigadier - General.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

West side Shoal Creek, Ala., October 6, 1864 - 7 a. m.

Captain RAMSEY,

Assistant Adjutant - General, General Thomas' Staff:

Reached this point with my command at 6 p. m. [yesterday], after a hard march of eighteen miles; raining hard during the day. I can hear nothing definite of Forrest's movements. A scout taken prisoners yesterday reports Forrest's command in the neighborhood of Lawrenceburg on the 2d. I have sent out scouts this morning in every direction in the hope of hearing something from him. My position is that I cover the Bainbridge and Lawrenceburg roads, and Lam withing seven miles of Florence. As I informed you in my dispatch of yesterday, there are so may places of crossing the Tennesee that it is exceedingly difficult to cover and watch all points. My opinion is that Forrest will exeptnally cross the Tennessee, probably below Florence at Waterloo. My present position being the most central one I shall remain here.

J. D. MORGAN,

Brigadier - General.