War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0063 Chapter LI. CORRESPONDEN-UNION.

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CITY POINT, VA., October 4, 1864-11. 30 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

General Wilson has been selected to go WEST to commadn Sherman's cavalry. As he is junior to the officers now serving with it, I would respectfully request that he be brevetted a major-general and assigned to duty with that rank.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, October 4, 1864-7. 36 p. m.

Major-General SHERMAN, Atlanta:

Governor Morton informs this Departmnet that you have closed the office of the Indiana State Agency Sanitary Commission, and turned over its property to the United States Sanitary Commission. You will please report the reason for the proceeding. The State agencies have generally been found efficient, trustworthy, and entitled to protection, and for this reason the hostility of the United States Commission to them has not been favored.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, October 4, 1864-7. 34 p. m.

Governor MORTON,

Indianapolis, Ind.:

General Sherman has been called upon for explanation of his action in relation to your Sanitary Commission. This Department will not favor any action to the prejudice of your well-conducted system, and least of all in favor of the United States Sanitary Commission.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

CONFIDENTIAL.] HDQRS. ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

City Point, Va., October 4, 1864.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 2nd instant, in relation to the movements of the Western armies, and the preparation ordered by the staff officers of General Canby, is received. When this campaign was commenced, nothing else was in contenplation but that Sherman, after capturing Atlanta, should connect with Canby at Mobile. Drawing the Nineteenth Corps, however, from Canby, and the movements of Kirby Smith demanding the presence of all of Canby's surplus forces in another direction, have made it impossible to carry out the plan as early as was contemplated. Any considerable force to co-operate with Sherman on the sea-coast must now be sent from here. The question is whether, under such circumstances, Augusta and Savannah would not be a better line, thatn Selma, Montgomery, and Mobile. I think Savannah might be taken by surprise with one corps from here and such troops as Foster