War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0056 Chapter LI. KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA.

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command. The river isn't fordable, and if we seize his means of crossing at Bainbridge he will be unable to cross anywhere else, and I think Rouseau ought certainly to destroy him. Two Ohio and three Kentucky regiments of the re-enforcements have arrived and are being distributed along the railroad.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

NASHVILLE, TENN., October 3, 1864-10. 30 p. m.

(Received 4th.)

Major T. T. ECKERT:

Enemy gone from Decatur railroad, having destroyed four miles of it, including three bridges over Carter's Creek, in addition to those already reported. Morgan caught Buford near Athens and punished him slightly. General Thomas arrived here to-day. No wires farther than Dalton, where Wheeler has again appeared and cut them and railroad. Hood said to have gone to Blue Mountain, to what end no one conceives.

J. C. VAN DUZER.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Two miles and a half south of Athens, Ala.,

October 3, 1864-10. 15 a. m.

Captain RAMSEY,

Asst. Adjt. General, General Thomas' Staff, Nashville, Tenn.:

My command has just reached this point. Most of yesterday and all night repairing railroad between Huntsville and the Decatur Junction. The road from junction to this point all right; from this to Athens the road badly cut up. Citizens living here inform me that rebel cavalry moved toward Tennessee River night before last and yesterday morning. Our forces have possession of Athens.

J. D. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General.

ATHENS, ALA., October 3, 1864-7 p. m.

Captain R. H. RAMSEY,

A. A. G., Major-General Thomas' Staff, Nashville, Tenn.:

Your dispatch, dated Tullahoma, October 2, 10 p. m., received at 6. 30 this p. m. As soon as the rations and wagons arrive I will move, as directed, to Bainbridge. The opinion of officers here is that Buford, with his forces, has succeeded in crossing the Tennessee. It has been raining heavily for nearly twenty-four hours. I am fearful if it continues during the night Elk River will be unfordable to-morrow. Not having pontoons, this, of course, would prevent my reaching Bainbridge in time. I shall have to wait for my train and supplies, there being none in the country.

11. 45 P. M.

Two railroad trains just arrived loaded with rations and wagons. There are but 175 cavalrymen here.

J. D. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General.