War of the Rebellion: Serial 079 Page 0030 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA., Chapter LI.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE TENNESSEE, October 2, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN, Atlanta:

When will General Stanley move? Please reply immediately.

O. O. HOWARD.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Atlanta, Ga., October 2, 1864.

Major General O. O. HOWARD, East Point:

General Stanley will move at early daylight.

L. M. DAYTON,

Aide-de-Camp.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. AND ARMY OF THE TENN., Numbers 224.

East Point, Ga., October 2, 1864.

* * * *

II. Major-General Osterhaus, commanding Fifteenth Corps, and Brigadier-General Leggett, commanding THIRD DIVISION, Seventeenth Corps, will hold their command ready to move at fifteen minutes' notice after 8 a. m. to-morrow until General Ransom returns.

III. This army will at once be put in marching order. All surplus stores and baggage will, during to-morrow, be sent to Atlanta and stored. The chief quartermasters will, to-morrow morning, secure proper buildings for storage. The number of day's rations and amount of ammunition, supplies, &c., to be taken will be indicated in orders hereafter.

By order of Major General O. O. Howard:

WM. T. CLARK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

East Point, Ga., October 2, 1864.

Cyrus A. Barrett, first sergeant Company I, and George W. Williams, private of Company D, both in Forty-fourth Illinois Volunteers, said they were captured, the 27th day of June, 1864, at Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., and taken from there to Andersonville, Ga., and escaped from the rebels the 10th day of September, 1864, twelve miles from Andersonville, by jumping off the cars at a place called Oglethorpe. They say from there they went in the direction of Columbus, Ga., crossed a railroad near Columbus; from there went to Thomaston, and from there to Greenville, and on that route saw no soldiers; were concealed near Greenville six days. While there saw mounted troops and a large wagon train moving on the Talbotton and Greenville road, going toward Newman, which is sixteen miles from Palmetto Station, and heard rebel soldiers say it was General Forrest's command from MISSISSIPPI going to join Hood's army; that there were 25,000 troops and 1,000 wagons. The wagon train was three days in passing, the 23d, 24th, and 25th days of September.

I believe the above respecting the movement of Forrest's troops and train to be mainly correct.

W. B. HAZEN,

Brigadier-General.

These men did not see many of Forrest's troops, only such as appeared to be guarding the train. Their estimate of his forces is founded entirely upon rumor, and is, of course, greatly exaggerated.

W. B. H.