War of the Rebellion: Serial 077 Page 0841 Chapter LI. SOUTHWEST MISSISSIPPI AND EAST LOUISIANA.

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In accordance with which I moved rapidly on the Wilson's Ferry road. Finding no enemy or no signs of one within ten miles, I halted and sent forward my scouts, who afterward reported to me that seven negro soldiers had appeared at Wilson's Ferry that morning, w ho, after being fired on by some stragglers, had retreated.

While feeding abut dark on the same evening I received the following order:

OCTOBER 7, 1864.

Colonel J. S. SCOTT:

COLONEL: Certain information received that the enemy have attacked Osyka; moving on Summit. Supposition is that parties are scattered, so that the general wishes to fall back on Brookhaven to-night. As soon as you have given the enemy a check fall back on Liberty, where he will await you. Greensburg and Camp Moore roads well guarded.

Very respectfully,

N. T. N. ROBINSON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

I then wrote you that for me to cross the angle and join you o the Brookhaven road would save me as ridge of ten or twelve mile, and that my horses were so much jaded that I would be compelled to rest until 11 o'clock; one hour after which I received the following order from you:

HEADQUARTERS,

October 7, 1864-7. 30 p. m.

Colonel J. S. SCOTT:

COLONEL: Report from Wingfield, at Summit, 2 p. m., that enemy turned off at Osyka on the Osyka [railroad]. Colonel gober all ready. Trains and artillery gone to Brookhaven. The general is waiting for you to come in. As you know, he is apprehensive of a column heading us off at Brookhaven from Natchez.

Respectfully,

N. T. N. ROBINSON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

I saddled up immediately, and when about to march I received the following order from you:

HEADQUARTERS,

October 7, 1864-8 p. m.

Colonel J. S. SCOTT:

COLONEL: The general desires you to hurry up in a gallop. Reports every moment of enemy on Greensburg road, advancing rapidly.

Respectfully,

N. T. N. ROBINSON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

When I arrived in Liberty I found you had left, and before leaving the town myself I received a dispatch (which I forwarded you) from Lieutenant Brown, my scout, who informed me that the enemy were retiring on Baton Rouge. A few moments after sending you the dispatch of Lieutenant Brown I received one from Lieutenant Leake, on the plank road, informing me that General Lee's cavalry from Baton Rouge only numbered 800 men. They came only as far as Williams' Bridge, some fourteen miles south of Clinton, sending 200 men into Clinton and 80 men in the direction of the railroad.

I waited twelve hours in Liberty for orders, and then hearing that the enemy were returning to Woodville, I moved out to meet them. I found the on Sunday, the 9th, between Bayou Sara and Woodville. Skirmished with them on Sunday evening and Monday morning, when